4 Comments

DIY Girls Beaded Heart Personalized Name Necklace – Martha Stewart Jewelry

DIY Girl's Beaded Heart Name Necklace

A couple weeks ago I was chosen to participate in a launch of the new Martha Stewart Jewelry by Plaid available exclusively at Michaels. They sent me an amazingly generous box of jewelry-making supplies and I was floored by the amount of possibilities I could envision. Included were glass beads, cabochons, faceted gems, colored enamels, epoxy clays, decorative molds, findings and tools I didn’t even know existed! In the end, I decided to focus on making a beaded necklace for Chloe.

Considering my limited jewelry-making experience, it was easier than I expected. I call this necklace her personalized “Heart of a Princess” necklace. And if I didn’t think that maybe I was too old for name necklaces (I’m no Carrie Bradshaw, after all), then you’d be seeing me wearing one just like it!

Here is what you’ll need to make your own beaded heart personalized name necklace:

From the Martha Stewart Jewelry line
Supplies (shown in the above photo)
6mm faceted round blue Czech beads
Heart tag silver chain
Hearts blue Czech beads
Strand block letters silver charms
Tools
Flat-nosed pliers & Needle-nosed pliers

Other Supplies
Illusion cord
Crimp beads
Lobster clasp

Note: This makes a 14″ necklace. Extra beads are needed for a longer version.

1. Cut a length of illusion cord 10 inches longer than your final piece. Mine was 24″ long. If you want, tie an end to something (like a key ring) so you don’t have to worry about beads falling off the opposite end. The extra length allows for mishaps and chances are smaller that beads will slip off while I’m working.

2. Remove the silver heart pendants from the Heart Tag Silver Chain by bending open the jump rings with your pliers. Then cut your beads off the packaging and use a bead box, small bowls, or other storage solution to organize and manage your beads.

3. Start by laying out your name, spacing each letter with two clear beads in between (note: small clear beads come with the block letter set). Then begin adding the colored beads to one side of the name, in the order shown below in the diagram.

From each side: sky heart, sky bead, clear bead, silver heart, teal heart, teal bead, clear bead, silver heart (repeat 4 and a half times). Note: be sure the hearts are facing away from the letters on each side.

4. Once your necklace is the desired length, finish it by threading the cord through a crimp bead and a clasp, and then back through the crimp bead. Pull the end until it rests close to your necklace and “crimp” or press the crimp bead flat with your pliers to secure. Do the same to the other end. Try it on and smile!

As you can tell from these photos, the necklace is a little long yet for Chloe at age four. This should give her many years of play and wear, and may even become a treasured keepsake. I love, too, that her favorite color is blue, just like mine. 🙂

Visit Plaid Crafts: Facebook / Twitter / Pinterest
Disclosure: This was a sponsored opportunity via The Blueprint Social, which occasionally provides wonderful opportunities like this one to flex my creative wings. The project idea and opinions are completely my own.
Here are some other projects by bloggers using the Martha Stewart Jewelry line:



3 Comments

DIY Freezer Paper Stenciled T-Shirt + Butterfly Template Printable

I thought I’d write a final update on the freezer paper stenciled butterfly t-shirt from a couple weeks ago. Those of you who follow this blog know that the original project ended in a craft fail, followed by an update that showed how I remade the shirt into a cute tank top for my daughter. However, that still didn’t leave me with a gift for my sister, which was the whole reason I started that project in the first place!

In the previous post, I shared how I was given a pack of Elmer’s Painters to review. According to the package, these acrylic paint markers can be used on any surface, even fabric. The only stipulation is to “heat set fabric before laundering, wash & dry on delicate cycle.” That got me thinking… and eventually I decided I would give it another try, using the markers instead of my usual screen printing ink.

I bought another of the same purple shirt and updated the design I had originally created with the new colors (Elmer’s Coral and Lilac). Be sure to wash and tumble dry the fabric you choose to stencil to take into account any shrinkage that may occur.

As before, I printed out my butterflies on craft freezer paper and cut them out carefully with my xacto knife. One cool thing about getting a do-over is that I remembered to put the inner pieces of the large butterfly back on before ironing it down in place.

This photo shows the process I used – instead of rubbing the markers across the fabric, I laid the color on by dotting the tip down onto the fabric, starting with the stencil edges and then filling in the center. I wanted the crispest edge possible. This process would be more time consuming on a larger image, but these butterflies were small and hardly took any time at all.

I waited until the ink was dry and later that same day I peeled off the stencil. Don’t wait too long or you’ll have problems pulling up the paper and may damage your work.

Ta-da!

So much better than before!

The directions aren’t specific about how long to heat set the stenciled image. Heat setting just means to give it a good press with a dry iron to help fuse the paint to the fabric. I pressed the shirt inside out with the image directly on my ironing board, before spending a minute or so ironing it directly. It put off a bit of acrid smoke, but not too bad. If you were unsure you could put a layer of old t-shirt over your image and then press it, in case you are worried about residue coming off on your iron or board.

Because this was a gift, I don’t know yet how well the image will wear. I’ll try and update that info here, if I ever find out.

What do you think? Want to make this t-shirt or one like it?

Here is a free Butterfly template printable pdf for you to download and print for your own project (or click on the butterfly graphic above). These butterflies could dress up anything from a onesie to a day bag – just enlarge it as needed. Enjoy!

P.S. There is still time to enter the giveaway for a set of Elmer’s Paint Markers AND a $25 Walmart gift card if you leave a comment on the previous post before midnight tonight, April 4th!

 


9 Comments

5 Impressive Cake Frosting Techniques + Tutorials

Petal Frosting by La Receta de la Felicidad

These days, happy bakers everywhere are upping the ante with beautiful frosting techniques. Not only do we want to enjoy our slice of cake, we want it to look good too. Not sure how to accomplish that? Here are 5 impressive techniques, including tutorials, to inspire you.

1. Smooth Frosting  Let’s start with the basics. Nothing says modern like the clean lines of this perfectly frosted cake. Check out How to Frost a Cake by Whisk Kid.

2. Textured Frosting  Want a more relaxed and traditional-looking topping? How to Frost a Cake by The Paula Deen Test Kitchen will show you.

3. Ribbon Frosting  This classic design is always impressive. The Sew*er, The Caker, The Copy-Cat Maker shows you the Ribbon Frosting Technique with lots of step-by-step photos.

4. Petal Frosting  This is one of my personal favorites. Such a stunning visual created with such easy steps. Check out My Cake School’s Pretty Petal Effect or Bird on a Cake’s Petal Tutorial. The pink cake shown here is the Ombre Petal Cake by Java Cupcake.

5. Rosette Frosting  A timelessly romantic design.  Girl. Inspired has a great tutorial called Tips for Making a Swirled Rose Cake. I am baker also has a well-done Rose Cake Tutorial, and provides a Rose Cake Video Tutorial as well.

Happy frosting!

 

 


3 Comments

Craft Re-fashion Tutorial: T-shirt to Girls Tank Top with Rosette

If you read yesterday’s post, you realize that I had a partially ruined purple shirt that I didn’t know what to do with. So, after mulling over that problem for a couple days, I decided to re-make it into something wearable for Chloe. A craft fail to a craft fashion, if you will.

The easiest item to make would be a tank top or tank dress. I wanted to do the least amount of sewing that I could get away with. After sketching a few ideas, I decided on this style that I had made for Chloe before. I’ll mention right now that this was my first time sewing knits, and could tell almost immediately that something wasn’t right. The material would get all bunched up under the needle. Some quick internet research revealed a special “stretch” needle is required to sew knits. Ah.

After returning from the craft store with a pack of “stretch” needles, I hesitantly began again. As long as I took things nice and steady it worked great. And now Chloe has a super cute tank top to wear this summer. I couldn’t be happier with the result. Yay! Craft Fail to Craft Re-fashion!

Have a t-shirt that needs a little make over? Here is all you have to do.

What you need:
T-shirt
Matching color thread
Elastic thread
Sewing machine
Scissors

  1. Cut your shirt. One straight horizontal cut right beneath the arm pits and then another straight cut about two inches below the first cut. The bottom piece will be the body of the tank top and the piece above that will be for your straps.
  2. Wind your bottom bobbin with the elastic thread by hand and insert it into your machine. Excellent directions on how to do this can be found here. Thread your matching color thread on top.
  3. Starting at a side seam on the body piece, sew a straight line horizontally one-half inch from the raw edge. Sew all the way around until you are back where you started and backstitch at the beginning and end (alternately, you can tie the elastic together where the ends meet). Repeat this step 3 more times, a half inch below each previous line.
  4. Steam your stitches with an iron -or- mist with water and gently and quickly press with a hot iron. This will cause the elastic to draw together, giving that puckered, shirred or “smocked” look. (If your girl is small like mine, you may need to stitch once more down a vertical side to take in some of the width).
  5. Replace your elastic bottom bobbin with regular thread. Using your little model (in this case, it was Chloe), measure and pin the shoulder straps in place and stitch them on. I used a zig-zag stitch here for stretch.

To make the rosette:
I followed a couple different directions online, but basically, the rosette shown is a lot like this video except I made two layers – a larger bottom layer and a smaller top layer (the rosette was an after thought – you’ll have to cut your fabric strips from the leftover neckline piece). Another interesting rosette tutorial can be found here and here. I pinned ours on with a safety pin, so I can pop it off and onto something else, if we want.

And that’s it! Chloe loves it and so do I. It is almost like it was meant to be. Maybe failing isn’t so bad after all. What do you think?

And here is one final photo of that face I love so much. My little sweetheart.

If, at first, you don’t succeed, try, try again. – Old proverb


3 Comments

How to Paint a Craigslist Dresser in 4 Easy Steps

I finally had it one day with our cluttered hallway. It was full of plastic bins, boxes of diapers, items destined for Goodwill, and all sorts of odds and ends stacked precariously. We knew that some day in the future we would make built-in cabinets, but for now it was screaming for some TLC. So I began looking on Craigslist for some possibilities.

Tip: Use a Craigslist mobile app – so helpful when you’re not at a computer.

Step 1: Choose your dresser
Using the app, I found several that suited my needs both aesthetically and size-wise. I was looking for something kid-friendly and streamlined, no knobs or funky carvings. Just basic. One in particular was priced just right at $20, and solid oak to boot! No particle board for me, thanks. Ironically, there were two of the same model of dresser for sale (see above photo). The other was selling for $195 (and in much better condition)!

Step 2: Clean & Sand
After bringing the dresser home and taking out all the drawers, we noticed some mouse droppings in a few of them. Alarming, but not a deal-breaker. I looked on the CDC website how to properly clean and disinfect the dresser, including making a homemade bleach solution of 1 part bleach to 10 parts water. It sucked, but I wasn’t going to take any chances. Then came the sanding. I was expecting to do the work myself, since my husband wasn’t crazy about my plan, but he kindly offered to do the remaining work for me. He used a palm sander and gave it a good once-over. I recommend using a mask and eye protection. A benefit of this dresser’s flat, no frills style is that there aren’t any details that require special sanding.

Step 3: Prime
We have a huge 5 gallon container of primer left over from when we did our home addition last year. Some people skip this step, and that might be okay on rarely used pieces, but this will be a working dresser. If you don’t want to see chips in the paint the first time you use it, or anytime soon, then you need to prime. Tape off any areas you don’t want to paint, or when a crisp line is desired. Use a roller for ease of coverage, but have a paintbrush handy to swipe corners and other details. We decided to not paint the inner drawers, but I plan to use drawer liners. Once the primer is dry, give it a once over by hand with fine sandpaper (and maybe a sanding block).

Step 4: Paint
Because we were looking for a small budget solution, we decided to use the leftover paint from our bathroom – a medium gray semi-gloss with a bit of blue called “Still Creek”. Make sure to roll it on smooth and constantly check for drips. You can see from the photo that David had a little helper. I thought this might leave streaks on the drawer fronts, but it doesn’t as long as you roll over it while it is still wet. Chloe loved “helping” daddy.

Now that the painting is done, don’t rush to use the dresser until the paint is fully cured. The longer you wait, the harder the finish will be – up to two weeks. Otherwise you risk smudges and marks. I asked at Home Depot about a top coat, but he assured us that one wasn’t needed as long as we waited for it to fully cure.

Ta da! Here’s our dresser sitting in its new hallway spot. Soon it will have a framed wall display to go above it, but that project is still in the works. I hope to be able to share it soon. Until then, good luck and happy painting!


1 Comment

Fallen Angel / Dark Fairy / Witch

Chloe asked me if I was going to dress up for Halloween, and seemed quite disappointed when I replied no. After all, she LOVES dressing up. She already wore her Minnie Mouse outfit to dance class this morning and can’t wait to wear her mermaid costume this evening to trick-or-treat. She then told me I could be a witch, because she saw a black witch’s hat in our decorations box. So I said, okay, I’ll wear the hat. But now I’m thinking maybe I’ll take it a step further… maybe some face make-up, too. Then I found this awesome tutorial online. Yeah, I think I could rock that look… maybe. 🙂


31 Comments

DIY Baby Mustache Pacifier + Printable Template PDF

Doesn’t it seem like the majority of the really cute “make for baby” projects are geared toward girls? I was reviewing the baby craft tutorial list and saw only a few for little boys. That got me thinking. What would be a fun and easy project to make for the baby?

How about mustache pacifiers!

These are hilarious. I’ve included the above printable pdf to download with several different styles. Handlebar mustache, anyone? Or perhaps a curling fu manchu? There are both Soothies and Avent pacifiers in our house, so that is what I used for sizing. You can cut the shapes straight from the printed sheet or use the template to cut the mustaches out of felt, as I did. Double stick tape worked well, although, if your child is older, you may want to do a better job of securing it, perhaps with hot glue or super glue.

Score one more for the boys club!

Common sense precaution: These are just a novelty. You probably shouldn’t leave your child unattended while using a mustache pacifier.

Copyright Note: Downloads are for personal, non-commercial use only. In addition, please do not redistribute or modify any of the templates. If you’d like to link to the pdf, please link to this post directly. Thanks!


4 Comments

Updated Tutorial & Printables List

I updated my Downloads + Tutorials page (see link under the header bar) with all the project tutorials and printable pdfs I’ve included on this blog. Hopefully they’ll be easier to find and use all in one place. Here are some:

1. DIY iPhone 4 Bumper Idea_2b.jpg, 2. Paper-Wrapped Jewelry Organizer, 3. bird magnets1.jpg, 4. Free Printable Valentine Flower card, 5. Chocolate Gift Jar Oreos.jpg, 6. Baby bib, 7. Halloween “Cauldron Bubbles” Treat, 8. IMG_7332.JPG, 9. “Dad” Father’s Day Card, 10. Cute Baby Hair Clips, 11. Holiday Gift tags, 12. Printable Holiday Gift Wrap, 13. Printable Holiday Cheer game board, 14. Felt photo album cover, 15. Vinyl Record Bowl, 16. Modern Happy Holidays Card


8 Comments

DIY iPhone 4 Bumper Idea + Template

I finally joined the ranks of the many iPhone carrying mamas this week. After constantly reaching for my husband’s iPhone, “borrowing” it during travels, and having him phone me while I’m out to tell me I received a work email that needs attention, I figured it was high time I got my own. Call me a brainwashed consumer, fine, but ask me what the weather is going to be, directions to the nearest coffee shop, or which apps are best for entertaining toddlers, and I’ll be able to show you with the touch of a button.

Brand spankin’ new out of the box, the new iPhone 4 is a pretty sight – shiny, hefty and fingerprint-free. But that doesn’t last – at least for me. Not only is the iPhone shared by my toddler, but just three days after I got it, I forgot and left it on my lap after a phone call in the car. When I got out of the car, it dropped off my lap and onto the pavement, chipping tragically in 3 places. Very sad indeed.

So, I got to thinking – how can I make an inexpensive, temporary bumper to protect my new investment while waiting the 4-6 weeks for the free case from Apple to arrive in the mail? A quick search pulled up this idea, but I don’t own one of those rubber “Live Strong” bracelets. Next I tried modifying this free template from case-mate, originally designed for the iPhone 3Gs. It didn’t fit. Then, I remembered a sheet of adhesive craft foam I picked up at the craft store (was it Michaels?) for about $1. Perfect!

How to make your own iPhone 4 bumper:

1. Cut a strip of adhesive or “sticky back” craft foam 12mm wide (.47 inch) using a ruler and an X-Acto knife. Although the iPhone 4 is only 9.3mm (0.37 inch) thick, this gives about a 1mm (0.04 inch) overhang on both the face and the back of the iPhone to act as a buffer during impact.

Ideally, you’d be able to cut just one strip about 345mm (13.58 inches) long to wrap completely around the perimeter, but since my foam sheet was letter-sized, I had to do it in two pieces.

2. Cut out holes within your strip: approx. 47mm x 5 mm (1.85″ x 0.196″) for the speakers and dock connector, 30mm x 5mm (1.18″ x 0.196″) for the volume and ring/vibrate controls, and 7mm x 5mm (0.275″ x 0.196″) for the headphone jack (7mm x 5mm). I left the on/off switch covered, which doesn’t affect it’s usage.

3. Carefully remove the backing and apply it to the sides of the iPhone, keeping about a 1mm overhang on each edge (centering the foam on the steel antenna band as neatly as possible) . If you need to, join two separate pieces to completely cover the perimeter, slightly pulling on the foam to stretch it only if you need to bridge the gap where the pieces join.

And there you have it, a cheap and easy DIY alternative to the more expensive bumpers for sale. Even better, craft foam sheets come in a rainbow of colors (I just happened to only have black and white on hand). While possibly not ideal, it is working great so far (with no dropped calls).

Not sure where to cut out all the appropriate holes? Try this free bumper template.


Leave a comment

Animal Magnet Photo Holder


If your a photographer, you’ve probably already heard of Photojojo. Most of it their offering is just quirky, gadget-y gift items, but there are a few neat things. The Animag Photo Stands are cute, for instance. If we had a shelf for photos around here, they would make a fun display. Feeling crafty? Here’s some basic advice on how to make your own.


10 Comments

DIY Paper-Covered Jewelry Organizer

Over the years I’ve collected, or been given, various pieces of jewelry. I stopped wearing most of it when Chloe was born (except for my wedding ring), and now that she is a little older I’ve begun to phase in a few pieces every now and again. Often I forget what I own until I go digging around in the box. The earrings and bracelets are organized somewhat decently, but the lengths of necklaces and pendants are all jumbled together. It is not a pretty sight.

Months ago I chose some paper and hardware to make two necklace hangers, although the hooks would also work nicely for rings and bracelets, too. Here is the one I made last week. It is sized to fit a narrow space on the wall of my closet. That’s the nice thing about making something yourself – it can be whatever you want it to be, plus it would make a sweet gift. The wood came from Home Depot (recycled from another project), the paper from Craft Warehouse and the hardware from Target.

Materials
12 x 12 sheet of heavy scrapbook paper
4 x 10″ piece of wood
7/8″ nickel-plated cup hooks
2 sawtooth hangers

Tools
Xacto Knife
Cutting Mat
Bone Folder
Glue or Double stick tape


Step 1: Fold the paper around the board, basically like you’re gift-wrapping a present. For best results, run the tip of a bone folder along the edges to make the smoothest and straightest folds possible.


Step 2: Seal the sides down with adhesive. I used double stick tape.


Step 3:
Make a tiny mark where you want the cup hooks to go. Drill pilot holes at each mark so the cup hooks will go in smoothly, and then screw them in. Finish by lightly pounding in the sawtooth hangers on the back side, one at each of the upper corners. Enjoy!


8 Comments

Make your own bean bag chair

Check out this cool bean bag chair by Joanna at Stardust Shoes. I never thought I’d say this about a bean bag chair, but I think this one is so fun. I wish I had one like it for Chloe’s room. She would totally dig it. Not only does she love to climb on chairs in general, but also to get in and out of boxes, bounce on cushions, and land in piles of dirty clothes on the floor. Wouldn’t playing with an oversize bean bag be like all those things?

Joanna offers both an adult-sized (shown above) and child-sized pdf tutorial, so technically I could make one myself. Maybe I will someday. Right now I’m stuck with a halfway finished spring top. I can’t seem to figure out the next step, and I’m not sure how best to move forward (Sandy, maybe I can ichat you and hold the instructions up to the camera?). Also strange is that I can’t find a single reference of anyone sewing this top, or any photos on Flickr or anywhere else. Maybe because it was written for teenagers and there aren’t any teenager-sewing-bloggers? Oh well. I might just try and wing it.


8 Comments

Stumped

Ever since making this Blossom Blouse for Chloe, I’ve been thinking about making a top for myself. I already have the fabric, but I can’t seem to make up my mind on which top to make. There is a surprising amount of factors that weigh on this decision. For example, I’d rather not buy a pattern for this initial attempt. I’d also like it to be easy enough to muddle through with minimal frustration, in a style I’d actually wear, and look decent with the large floral print of the fabric I’ve chosen. And so on.

A few contenders right now are this Spring Ruffle Top Tutorial, the Strapless Belted Tunic from One-Yard Wonders, and the Baby Doll Tunic from Sew Teen (laugh if you want). Also, I’ve really enjoyed seeing the 2010 Spring Top Week entries – the three pictured above are a few styles I could see wearing myself (in different prints). I guess I need to get sewing if I want to enter my own!


5 Comments

Sewing Machine Cover + Smallest Sewing Table Ever

My sewing machine has a new dress! The ugly plastic one it came with finally got the heave-ho. Looks nice, doesn’t it? I got all ambitious and added a back pocket and a hole on top for the carrying handle, except I couldn’t figure out how to properly fold inside corners with bias-tape. It ended up oval, except I had already cut a rectangle in the fabric and the bias-tape didn’t “catch” the corners. I fixed that with a little fabric glue. Just don’t look too close.

Before Chloe, the “spare” room (that is now her nursery) used to be where we kept the TV, the sewing table, and the futon. With Chloe’s arrival, we had no choice but to move the TV into the living room and the sewing table into our bedroom, wedged between the dresser and the hamper, because there was literally nowhere else in our little house to put it. Luckily, it folds down really small, as you can see. I also took a photo of the table fully opened.

I was this close to using Alexander Henry’s Mocca for the sewing machine cover, but after walking it and the Joel Dewberry Ginseng into the bedroom, I realized right away the Mocca wouldn’t jive with the serenity of the bedroom. Much the same way that I wouldn’t have been able to stand the TV in the bedroom. The walls are white, the curtains white, and my favorite duvet cover is white with only a few oversize, very abstract, pale blue, taupe and brick-colored butterflies. It was meant to be.

Good tutorials and inspiration for making sewing machine covers can be found at Chez Larsson, Spool, and Creative Reveries.


1 Comment

Valentine Idea: Day 3 – Handmade Stamps

Handmade Stamps – I’ve always liked stamps, but I’m pretty picky about the few I end up buying. I need to know I’ll use them again and again. Heart and love stamps can be particularly useful, from cards and envelopes to gift wrap and fabric. Here are a couple fun ideas and tutorials to make your own, or you could buy one handmade.


Heart Stamps from Potatoes


Stamp your own conversation hearts


Handcarved Valentine Stamp, Cupid


1 Comment

New Masthead

Did you notice I updated the masthead? I don’t know how bloggers like Dooce find the time and inspiration to put up a new one every month. I’m lucky if it gets update once a year. Actually, I didn’t even fully design this one myself, but incorporated free artwork from Vecteezy. There was something about the cheerful color and simple landscape that drew me, or maybe I just had trees on the brain. It is also worth checking out brusheezy (photoshop brushes), flasheezy (free flash), and fresheezy (free websites).

I’ve also added a Paperseed blog button, which you can find on the sidebar. I followed the instructions here to learn how to make the text box for the code, in case you want to make a button of your own available. If you want to place my button on the sidebar of your blog, you can follow these directions (for wordpress): Go to your dashboard and click on Appearance > Widgets. Drag a new “Text” widget to your sidebar. Copy the code from the box underneath my blog button and paste it into the textbox of your new “Text” widget. Hit save and close and you should see it on your homepage. Enjoy!


4 Comments

Bias-tape Baby Bib Tutorial and Template


You can download this bib template or just freehand one

Another project that I tried while visiting Chloe’s Grandma Sandy was how to make a bias tape bib. Back when I was pregnant I had read that bibs with ties were a choking hazard, so when we were yard-saling we mostly picked up velcro versions. Turns out the ties are SO much better because you can get a custom fit around the neck, and baby can’t pull it off like she can with the velcro. Two of my favorite bibs were ones I won from Quilt Baby (now called The Modern Baby Co.), so Grandma Sandy showed me how to make something similar, while also giving me an introduction to bias tape. Here’s what I learned:

Materials for Bib
fabric piece for the cover (approx 8″x8″)
terry cloth for backing (approx 8″x8″)
bias tape (approx 54″)

1. Cut out the desired shape from a piece of cover fabric (front) and a piece of terry cloth (back). This is an ideal project for scraps. The one in the photo is about 7.75 x 8 inches. You can download, print and trace this bib template, or just freehand one.

2. Pin the two pieces together, pretty sides out.

3. Starting from the top corner, sandwich the raw edges of the fabric between a first piece of bias-tape, from one side to the other, pinning as you go. Keep in mind that the longer side of the bias-tape goes on the back so that it will “catch” when you sew it down (see this great bias-tape tutorial and video). We’re using pre-made bias tape that is 1/2″ wide folded, but you can learn to make your own from this video .

4. Cut the bias tape on both ends so that it is flush with the fabric, or just slightly longer. Sew this piece of tape down with a straight stitch, close to the edge of where the tape meets the fabric, but being careful not to fall off the edge of the tape. If it is important to you, match the top thread to the top fabric and the bottom thread to the terrycloth.

4. Next, sandwich and pin a second piece of bias-tape around the remaining outside perimeter, being sure to leave enough tape on both ends (about 11-12″) to form the strings for tying. Fold under the raw edge tips of the tape ties and tuck inside itself for a neat appearance.

5. Starting on one end of the tape, sew the tape together, all the way around until you get to the other side. Now just snip the threads and your done!


7 Comments

Appliqued Handtowels in 5 easy steps

While we were in Colorado earlier this month, I had an opportunity to watch my mother-in-law make this fun set of appliqued handtowels as a gift. She made it look so easy! Here are the materials and steps she used:

Materials
Dishtowel
Double sided fusible interface
Fabric scrap for the design
Thread for both the top side and bottom side

1. Find an image that you like and cut the shape out of both the interface and fabric. Sandy chose to use this cat image.

2. Sandwich the fusible interface between the dishtowel and the fabric, and iron them together until they are properly adhered.

3. Using a satin stitch (also called applique stitch, or tight zig-zag stitch), sew around the border of your shape. This will cover the raw edges of the fabric. I was surprised to note that Sandy kept the feed dog up, yet was able to move the fabric around with her fingers pretty easily.

4. After the border of the shape is done, use a pencil to draw the inner details to be “traced” by stitching. Sandy wanted to use a thinner satin stitch, so she adjusted the settings on her sewing machine and did a few tests before continuing.

5. Stitch over the pencil marks to add detail. Sandy noted that it is very helpful to always snip the loose threads as you go.

The finished designs!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...