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DIY Girls Beaded Heart Personalized Name Necklace – Martha Stewart Jewelry

DIY Girl's Beaded Heart Name Necklace

A couple weeks ago I was chosen to participate in a launch of the new Martha Stewart Jewelry by Plaid available exclusively at Michaels. They sent me an amazingly generous box of jewelry-making supplies and I was floored by the amount of possibilities I could envision. Included were glass beads, cabochons, faceted gems, colored enamels, epoxy clays, decorative molds, findings and tools I didn’t even know existed! In the end, I decided to focus on making a beaded necklace for Chloe.

Considering my limited jewelry-making experience, it was easier than I expected. I call this necklace her personalized “Heart of a Princess” necklace. And if I didn’t think that maybe I was too old for name necklaces (I’m no Carrie Bradshaw, after all), then you’d be seeing me wearing one just like it!

Here is what you’ll need to make your own beaded heart personalized name necklace:

From the Martha Stewart Jewelry line
Supplies (shown in the above photo)
6mm faceted round blue Czech beads
Heart tag silver chain
Hearts blue Czech beads
Strand block letters silver charms
Tools
Flat-nosed pliers & Needle-nosed pliers

Other Supplies
Illusion cord
Crimp beads
Lobster clasp

Note: This makes a 14″ necklace. Extra beads are needed for a longer version.

1. Cut a length of illusion cord 10 inches longer than your final piece. Mine was 24″ long. If you want, tie an end to something (like a key ring) so you don’t have to worry about beads falling off the opposite end. The extra length allows for mishaps and chances are smaller that beads will slip off while I’m working.

2. Remove the silver heart pendants from the Heart Tag Silver Chain by bending open the jump rings with your pliers. Then cut your beads off the packaging and use a bead box, small bowls, or other storage solution to organize and manage your beads.

3. Start by laying out your name, spacing each letter with two clear beads in between (note: small clear beads come with the block letter set). Then begin adding the colored beads to one side of the name, in the order shown below in the diagram.

From each side: sky heart, sky bead, clear bead, silver heart, teal heart, teal bead, clear bead, silver heart (repeat 4 and a half times). Note: be sure the hearts are facing away from the letters on each side.

4. Once your necklace is the desired length, finish it by threading the cord through a crimp bead and a clasp, and then back through the crimp bead. Pull the end until it rests close to your necklace and “crimp” or press the crimp bead flat with your pliers to secure. Do the same to the other end. Try it on and smile!

As you can tell from these photos, the necklace is a little long yet for Chloe at age four. This should give her many years of play and wear, and may even become a treasured keepsake. I love, too, that her favorite color is blue, just like mine. 🙂

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Disclosure: This was a sponsored opportunity via The Blueprint Social, which occasionally provides wonderful opportunities like this one to flex my creative wings. The project idea and opinions are completely my own.
Here are some other projects by bloggers using the Martha Stewart Jewelry line:



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Craft Re-fashion Tutorial: T-shirt to Girls Tank Top with Rosette

If you read yesterday’s post, you realize that I had a partially ruined purple shirt that I didn’t know what to do with. So, after mulling over that problem for a couple days, I decided to re-make it into something wearable for Chloe. A craft fail to a craft fashion, if you will.

The easiest item to make would be a tank top or tank dress. I wanted to do the least amount of sewing that I could get away with. After sketching a few ideas, I decided on this style that I had made for Chloe before. I’ll mention right now that this was my first time sewing knits, and could tell almost immediately that something wasn’t right. The material would get all bunched up under the needle. Some quick internet research revealed a special “stretch” needle is required to sew knits. Ah.

After returning from the craft store with a pack of “stretch” needles, I hesitantly began again. As long as I took things nice and steady it worked great. And now Chloe has a super cute tank top to wear this summer. I couldn’t be happier with the result. Yay! Craft Fail to Craft Re-fashion!

Have a t-shirt that needs a little make over? Here is all you have to do.

What you need:
T-shirt
Matching color thread
Elastic thread
Sewing machine
Scissors

  1. Cut your shirt. One straight horizontal cut right beneath the arm pits and then another straight cut about two inches below the first cut. The bottom piece will be the body of the tank top and the piece above that will be for your straps.
  2. Wind your bottom bobbin with the elastic thread by hand and insert it into your machine. Excellent directions on how to do this can be found here. Thread your matching color thread on top.
  3. Starting at a side seam on the body piece, sew a straight line horizontally one-half inch from the raw edge. Sew all the way around until you are back where you started and backstitch at the beginning and end (alternately, you can tie the elastic together where the ends meet). Repeat this step 3 more times, a half inch below each previous line.
  4. Steam your stitches with an iron -or- mist with water and gently and quickly press with a hot iron. This will cause the elastic to draw together, giving that puckered, shirred or “smocked” look. (If your girl is small like mine, you may need to stitch once more down a vertical side to take in some of the width).
  5. Replace your elastic bottom bobbin with regular thread. Using your little model (in this case, it was Chloe), measure and pin the shoulder straps in place and stitch them on. I used a zig-zag stitch here for stretch.

To make the rosette:
I followed a couple different directions online, but basically, the rosette shown is a lot like this video except I made two layers – a larger bottom layer and a smaller top layer (the rosette was an after thought – you’ll have to cut your fabric strips from the leftover neckline piece). Another interesting rosette tutorial can be found here and here. I pinned ours on with a safety pin, so I can pop it off and onto something else, if we want.

And that’s it! Chloe loves it and so do I. It is almost like it was meant to be. Maybe failing isn’t so bad after all. What do you think?

And here is one final photo of that face I love so much. My little sweetheart.

If, at first, you don’t succeed, try, try again. – Old proverb


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Wonderland Skirt

This darling skirt came in the mail from Australia for Chloe last week. It was handmade by my craft swap partner, Doreen. I adore the Wonderland fabric she chose, and that she thoughtfully left a small opening in the back, so I could fit the elastic waist perfectly on Chloe. Good thing Chloe and I wear vastly different sizes, or I might find myself stealing this little gem right out of her closet.

Some of Doreen’s other projects can be seen on her brand new blog Phil and Jack.

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