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DIY Boys Totally Radical Rocket Ship Onesie :: Totally Tulip® Fabric Paints

DIY Boys Rocket Ship Onesie Tutorial

Note: This is a sponsored post. I was given paints to use for this project, but the idea, opinions and tutorial below are completely my own.

Do you remember using Tulip Soft and 3D Paints (aka “Puffy Paint”) back in the eighties? I was a kid back then and remember seeing it everywhere – jackets, shoes, school bags, and of course, t-shirts! It was one of those fun DIY projects that everyone could do, with good results almost every time.

Flash forward thirty years. Tulip has kindly given me the opportunity to re-live those moments using their products! My task: to update a shirt using the classic techniques from my childhood.

For this project, I thought that I would do something with Leo in mind, for a change. He loves things that go, especially trucks, construction vehicles and airplanes. Then, as I was starting to jot down ideas, a rocket ship came to mind, and I knew he would love it!

Here are the steps, including a printable stencil that you can download for free!

DIY Boys Totally Radical Rocket Ship Onesie

Supplies :
Onesie or T-shirt
Freezer Paper
Xacto knife or scissors
Iron
Foam Craft Brushes
Tulip Dimensional Fabric Paint

1. Start with a clean onesie that has been washed and dried at least once.

2. Download the rocket ship image and print it out onto freezer paper (more on freezer paper stencils here). Carefully cut out the shaded areas with an xacto blade to make your stencil.

3. Position the stencil on your shirt where you would like it and then iron it down in place.

4. Place a piece of cardboard on the inside of your onesie (to keep paint from possibly bleeding through). Using your paint and foam craft brush, press the paint gently onto your fabric using a tapping motion until all areas are filled, changing colors as desired. Let dry for about 4 hours.

5. Once dry, gently peel the stencil off of the fabric. Now, outline your filled in areas. Tulip Dimensional Fabric Paint has a fine applicator point perfect for this kind of work. Let that dry another 4 hours and your little one will be ready to blast off!

The onesie shown uses Tulip Soft Fabric Paint in Neon Orange, and Tulip Slick Dimensional Paint in Fluorescent Blue, Green, Yellow and Orange.

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Tulip continues to be a craft favorite in households today! In addition to Tulip Soft Paints and Dimensional Fabric paints included in my post, Tulip is known for it’s wide variety of Fashion Glitters, Glam it up Crystals, Fabric Markers and One-Step Tie Dye! Find all your favorite Tulip products by clicking here.

In fact, all this summer Tulip is bringing tie dye to the masses with their Tie Dye Your Summer campaign! Visit their Tie Dye Your Summer site at Tie Dye Your Summer. They have so many fun tie dye videos and inspirations as well as an awesome giveaway of a tie dye iPad and party (it really is an amazing prize pack that you’ll want to enter! Click here to enter this exclusive giveaway!

Find more I Love To Create project ideas, tutorials, videos and more on Facebook / Twitter / Pinterest / Blog

See more Tulip Paint projects from other participating bloggers below:


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DIY Girls Beaded Heart Personalized Name Necklace – Martha Stewart Jewelry

DIY Girl's Beaded Heart Name Necklace

A couple weeks ago I was chosen to participate in a launch of the new Martha Stewart Jewelry by Plaid available exclusively at Michaels. They sent me an amazingly generous box of jewelry-making supplies and I was floored by the amount of possibilities I could envision. Included were glass beads, cabochons, faceted gems, colored enamels, epoxy clays, decorative molds, findings and tools I didn’t even know existed! In the end, I decided to focus on making a beaded necklace for Chloe.

Considering my limited jewelry-making experience, it was easier than I expected. I call this necklace her personalized “Heart of a Princess” necklace. And if I didn’t think that maybe I was too old for name necklaces (I’m no Carrie Bradshaw, after all), then you’d be seeing me wearing one just like it!

Here is what you’ll need to make your own beaded heart personalized name necklace:

From the Martha Stewart Jewelry line
Supplies (shown in the above photo)
6mm faceted round blue Czech beads
Heart tag silver chain
Hearts blue Czech beads
Strand block letters silver charms
Tools
Flat-nosed pliers & Needle-nosed pliers

Other Supplies
Illusion cord
Crimp beads
Lobster clasp

Note: This makes a 14″ necklace. Extra beads are needed for a longer version.

1. Cut a length of illusion cord 10 inches longer than your final piece. Mine was 24″ long. If you want, tie an end to something (like a key ring) so you don’t have to worry about beads falling off the opposite end. The extra length allows for mishaps and chances are smaller that beads will slip off while I’m working.

2. Remove the silver heart pendants from the Heart Tag Silver Chain by bending open the jump rings with your pliers. Then cut your beads off the packaging and use a bead box, small bowls, or other storage solution to organize and manage your beads.

3. Start by laying out your name, spacing each letter with two clear beads in between (note: small clear beads come with the block letter set). Then begin adding the colored beads to one side of the name, in the order shown below in the diagram.

From each side: sky heart, sky bead, clear bead, silver heart, teal heart, teal bead, clear bead, silver heart (repeat 4 and a half times). Note: be sure the hearts are facing away from the letters on each side.

4. Once your necklace is the desired length, finish it by threading the cord through a crimp bead and a clasp, and then back through the crimp bead. Pull the end until it rests close to your necklace and “crimp” or press the crimp bead flat with your pliers to secure. Do the same to the other end. Try it on and smile!

As you can tell from these photos, the necklace is a little long yet for Chloe at age four. This should give her many years of play and wear, and may even become a treasured keepsake. I love, too, that her favorite color is blue, just like mine. 🙂

Visit Plaid Crafts: Facebook / Twitter / Pinterest
Disclosure: This was a sponsored opportunity via The Blueprint Social, which occasionally provides wonderful opportunities like this one to flex my creative wings. The project idea and opinions are completely my own.
Here are some other projects by bloggers using the Martha Stewart Jewelry line:



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Adorable Animal-Inspired Clothing for Kids

Brown Bear DressBrown Bear Girls Dress by Wild Things Dresses

I have seen some of the cutest little animal-inspired outfits and accessories lately. My kids would love them, I have no doubt. What kid wouldn’t? They are the perfect blend of daily-wear/play clothes and dress-up costume, all in one.

Here are a few of my favorites, including a neat DIY tutorial at the end for kitten flats that would be awesome for any age!

Fox Knit Scarf by Tre Melarance
Kids Fox Knit Scarf
Kids Fox Coat by Little Goodall
Kids Fox Coat Jacket
Girls Baby Mouse Dress by Wild Things Dresses
Gray Girls Mouse Dress Kids
DIY Cat Toe Shoes by Kate at Scathingly Brilliant
DIY Cat Kitten Painted Shoes

 


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DIY Chalkboard Painted Platter

DIY Spray Painted Chalkboard Platter
David and I have been married for almost nine years. Since much of our wedding was a DIY affair, we have several items leftover from that event, including a set of large serving trays from Ikea. To be honest, I’ve hardly ever used them, mostly because I don’t like the strange graphic on the front. At the time, they were just what we needed, and the image was easily covered by tissue paper or whatever was on it. I figured it was time to make them less ugly and more useful.

This is where chalkboard paint comes in. I used Rust-Oleum Chalkboard Spray Paint in Flat Black. It took a couple coats to get the coverage I was looking for (see below), but the finish turned out surprisingly nice! I didn’t do any prepping either, just made sure it was clean and dry to begin with (I learned on this project that I do not like the effect of starting with a primer).

DIY Spray Painted Chalkboard Platter Steps

Ta-da!

Now I have an elegant serving platter that works for all occasions. And, even better, the kids have fun drawing on it! We have had it now for about 8 months and the chalkboard finish still looks as good as new. I will say that it doesn’t erase as easily as I’d like, but a simple washing with soap and water removes all traces of remaining chalk dust. Overall, it is quite handy, and gets more use now that when we first bought it.

Kids playing on the chalkboard platter

Do you like chalkboards? Or chalkboard lettering? Tomorrow I’ll be sharing a free printable as well as links to some lovely chalkboard fonts. See you then!


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5 Impressive Cake Frosting Techniques + Tutorials

Petal Frosting by La Receta de la Felicidad

These days, happy bakers everywhere are upping the ante with beautiful frosting techniques. Not only do we want to enjoy our slice of cake, we want it to look good too. Not sure how to accomplish that? Here are 5 impressive techniques, including tutorials, to inspire you.

1. Smooth Frosting  Let’s start with the basics. Nothing says modern like the clean lines of this perfectly frosted cake. Check out How to Frost a Cake by Whisk Kid.

2. Textured Frosting  Want a more relaxed and traditional-looking topping? How to Frost a Cake by The Paula Deen Test Kitchen will show you.

3. Ribbon Frosting  This classic design is always impressive. The Sew*er, The Caker, The Copy-Cat Maker shows you the Ribbon Frosting Technique with lots of step-by-step photos.

4. Petal Frosting  This is one of my personal favorites. Such a stunning visual created with such easy steps. Check out My Cake School’s Pretty Petal Effect or Bird on a Cake’s Petal Tutorial. The pink cake shown here is the Ombre Petal Cake by Java Cupcake.

5. Rosette Frosting  A timelessly romantic design.  Girl. Inspired has a great tutorial called Tips for Making a Swirled Rose Cake. I am baker also has a well-done Rose Cake Tutorial, and provides a Rose Cake Video Tutorial as well.

Happy frosting!

 

 


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Craft Fail: Freezer Paper Stenciled T-shirt (Part 1 of 2)

An integral part of doing anything well, is failing. Some things I do turn out well, but sometimes they don’t, despite my best intentions. One good example of this happened a few weekends ago. I was so bummed that I even wrote on Facebook how down I felt about it the day after. I mean, I understand burning a cake, because I forgot to set the timer, or a sewing fail because I’m a beginner, but freezer paper stenciling a shirt? C’mon! I’m practically an expert at it (yeah right)!

Anyway, I felt sad, because it was a project for my sister’s birthday that was already late. Her favorite color is purple and she has a penchant for butterflies. A while ago, I picked up a pretty set of purple and pink butterfly decals for her room, but I wanted to add something else, something handmade.

I bought a purple t-shirt and decided to stencil some matching butterflies on it. Below are a couple designs I came up with. It was a tough decision. Both A & B were nice, but my sister has long hair which would obscure B, and sits in a wheelchair which might partially obscure A, so then I came up with C: a few butterflies on the back of her left shoulder, which would be unique and sweet, a lot like she is.

Once decided, I got out my supplies and got to work.

Here is the stencil cut out from the freezer paper, using an x-acto knife:

And here is where it all went wrong…

When I opened the screen printing ink, I found it mostly dried out (it was a few years old, after all). My gut reaction was to run to the art supply store and buy another jar, but then I read on the label “thin with water as needed.” Okay, I’d give that a try. It was a gloppy mess, but I only needed to cover a small area, right? So, I ironed down the stencil, let it cool and applied a layer of ink.

Besides being dried up, I had forgotten something vital. This ink color was transparent. It worked great on white or light colors, but I wanted opaque “sit-on-top” coverage (magenta on purple). So, once I peeled off the stencil, instead of a nice solid top color, it looked like a stain…

Noooooooooooo!

As I said, I was hoping to have that shirt dry and out the door the next day, but instead – CRAFT FAIL! Even now I still have the decals sitting on my desk because I haven’t found another gift to go with it. Hopefully something will turn up, and soon.

Sorry, sis.

Anyway, I just thought I’d share this here. Life happens. Things go wrong, but crafting goes on. And to prove this, come back tomorrow for Part 2, and find out what happened to that poor purple shirt.

How do you cope with craft fails or failure in general? Do you just roll with it? Do you try again right away or put it off for a while (or permanently) like I sometimes do? Where do you find inspiration and encouragement to keep on going?

“If you have made mistakes, even serious ones, there is always another chance for you. What we call failure is not the falling down but the staying down.” – Mary Pickford

 


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Light Up Valentines + Free Printable PDF

Chloe worked on her Valentine cards right after breakfast this morning. I had designed these cards a few weeks back, knowing I had a stash of tiny finger flashlights for her to give away. These super bright LED Finger Flashlights are about 20¢ each when you buy a set on Amazon. Keeping their size in mind, I made a similar-sized flashlight with a heart and then included the phrase “You Light Up My Life Valentine.” Interestingly, this is the first time I felt like typefaces failed me. None of them looked quite right, so I ended up handwriting it and then scanning it in. Much better!

Here’s what the cards look like freshly printed:

This is what the packages of finger flashlights look like:

If you decide to add a finger light onto a card, use an x-acto knife to cut a small tab near the middle of the printed flashlight, like shown. Then slide the elastic loop onto the tab. Like this:

Continue Reading →


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DIY Baby Mustache Pacifier + Printable Template PDF

Doesn’t it seem like the majority of the really cute “make for baby” projects are geared toward girls? I was reviewing the baby craft tutorial list and saw only a few for little boys. That got me thinking. What would be a fun and easy project to make for the baby?

How about mustache pacifiers!

These are hilarious. I’ve included the above printable pdf to download with several different styles. Handlebar mustache, anyone? Or perhaps a curling fu manchu? There are both Soothies and Avent pacifiers in our house, so that is what I used for sizing. You can cut the shapes straight from the printed sheet or use the template to cut the mustaches out of felt, as I did. Double stick tape worked well, although, if your child is older, you may want to do a better job of securing it, perhaps with hot glue or super glue.

Score one more for the boys club!

Common sense precaution: These are just a novelty. You probably shouldn’t leave your child unattended while using a mustache pacifier.

Copyright Note: Downloads are for personal, non-commercial use only. In addition, please do not redistribute or modify any of the templates. If you’d like to link to the pdf, please link to this post directly. Thanks!


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Turkey surprise for the kids

We will be spending our Thanksgiving with good friends again this year, and thankfully, we’re only responsible for bringing rolls and making the gravy. The hostess was considering seating the four toddlers at their own table, and while they are too young yet for popcorn, I thought this idea was a clever way to add some whimsy to a kids table. Instructions can be found here.


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Updated Tutorial & Printables List

I updated my Downloads + Tutorials page (see link under the header bar) with all the project tutorials and printable pdfs I’ve included on this blog. Hopefully they’ll be easier to find and use all in one place. Here are some:

1. DIY iPhone 4 Bumper Idea_2b.jpg, 2. Paper-Wrapped Jewelry Organizer, 3. bird magnets1.jpg, 4. Free Printable Valentine Flower card, 5. Chocolate Gift Jar Oreos.jpg, 6. Baby bib, 7. Halloween “Cauldron Bubbles” Treat, 8. IMG_7332.JPG, 9. “Dad” Father’s Day Card, 10. Cute Baby Hair Clips, 11. Holiday Gift tags, 12. Printable Holiday Gift Wrap, 13. Printable Holiday Cheer game board, 14. Felt photo album cover, 15. Vinyl Record Bowl, 16. Modern Happy Holidays Card


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DIY iPhone 4 Bumper Idea + Template

I finally joined the ranks of the many iPhone carrying mamas this week. After constantly reaching for my husband’s iPhone, “borrowing” it during travels, and having him phone me while I’m out to tell me I received a work email that needs attention, I figured it was high time I got my own. Call me a brainwashed consumer, fine, but ask me what the weather is going to be, directions to the nearest coffee shop, or which apps are best for entertaining toddlers, and I’ll be able to show you with the touch of a button.

Brand spankin’ new out of the box, the new iPhone 4 is a pretty sight – shiny, hefty and fingerprint-free. But that doesn’t last – at least for me. Not only is the iPhone shared by my toddler, but just three days after I got it, I forgot and left it on my lap after a phone call in the car. When I got out of the car, it dropped off my lap and onto the pavement, chipping tragically in 3 places. Very sad indeed.

So, I got to thinking – how can I make an inexpensive, temporary bumper to protect my new investment while waiting the 4-6 weeks for the free case from Apple to arrive in the mail? A quick search pulled up this idea, but I don’t own one of those rubber “Live Strong” bracelets. Next I tried modifying this free template from case-mate, originally designed for the iPhone 3Gs. It didn’t fit. Then, I remembered a sheet of adhesive craft foam I picked up at the craft store (was it Michaels?) for about $1. Perfect!

How to make your own iPhone 4 bumper:

1. Cut a strip of adhesive or “sticky back” craft foam 12mm wide (.47 inch) using a ruler and an X-Acto knife. Although the iPhone 4 is only 9.3mm (0.37 inch) thick, this gives about a 1mm (0.04 inch) overhang on both the face and the back of the iPhone to act as a buffer during impact.

Ideally, you’d be able to cut just one strip about 345mm (13.58 inches) long to wrap completely around the perimeter, but since my foam sheet was letter-sized, I had to do it in two pieces.

2. Cut out holes within your strip: approx. 47mm x 5 mm (1.85″ x 0.196″) for the speakers and dock connector, 30mm x 5mm (1.18″ x 0.196″) for the volume and ring/vibrate controls, and 7mm x 5mm (0.275″ x 0.196″) for the headphone jack (7mm x 5mm). I left the on/off switch covered, which doesn’t affect it’s usage.

3. Carefully remove the backing and apply it to the sides of the iPhone, keeping about a 1mm overhang on each edge (centering the foam on the steel antenna band as neatly as possible) . If you need to, join two separate pieces to completely cover the perimeter, slightly pulling on the foam to stretch it only if you need to bridge the gap where the pieces join.

And there you have it, a cheap and easy DIY alternative to the more expensive bumpers for sale. Even better, craft foam sheets come in a rainbow of colors (I just happened to only have black and white on hand). While possibly not ideal, it is working great so far (with no dropped calls).

Not sure where to cut out all the appropriate holes? Try this free bumper template.


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DIY Paper-Covered Jewelry Organizer

Over the years I’ve collected, or been given, various pieces of jewelry. I stopped wearing most of it when Chloe was born (except for my wedding ring), and now that she is a little older I’ve begun to phase in a few pieces every now and again. Often I forget what I own until I go digging around in the box. The earrings and bracelets are organized somewhat decently, but the lengths of necklaces and pendants are all jumbled together. It is not a pretty sight.

Months ago I chose some paper and hardware to make two necklace hangers, although the hooks would also work nicely for rings and bracelets, too. Here is the one I made last week. It is sized to fit a narrow space on the wall of my closet. That’s the nice thing about making something yourself – it can be whatever you want it to be, plus it would make a sweet gift. The wood came from Home Depot (recycled from another project), the paper from Craft Warehouse and the hardware from Target.

Materials
12 x 12 sheet of heavy scrapbook paper
4 x 10″ piece of wood
7/8″ nickel-plated cup hooks
2 sawtooth hangers

Tools
Xacto Knife
Cutting Mat
Bone Folder
Glue or Double stick tape


Step 1: Fold the paper around the board, basically like you’re gift-wrapping a present. For best results, run the tip of a bone folder along the edges to make the smoothest and straightest folds possible.


Step 2: Seal the sides down with adhesive. I used double stick tape.


Step 3:
Make a tiny mark where you want the cup hooks to go. Drill pilot holes at each mark so the cup hooks will go in smoothly, and then screw them in. Finish by lightly pounding in the sawtooth hangers on the back side, one at each of the upper corners. Enjoy!


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Bias-tape Baby Bib Tutorial and Template


You can download this bib template or just freehand one

Another project that I tried while visiting Chloe’s Grandma Sandy was how to make a bias tape bib. Back when I was pregnant I had read that bibs with ties were a choking hazard, so when we were yard-saling we mostly picked up velcro versions. Turns out the ties are SO much better because you can get a custom fit around the neck, and baby can’t pull it off like she can with the velcro. Two of my favorite bibs were ones I won from Quilt Baby (now called The Modern Baby Co.), so Grandma Sandy showed me how to make something similar, while also giving me an introduction to bias tape. Here’s what I learned:

Materials for Bib
fabric piece for the cover (approx 8″x8″)
terry cloth for backing (approx 8″x8″)
bias tape (approx 54″)

1. Cut out the desired shape from a piece of cover fabric (front) and a piece of terry cloth (back). This is an ideal project for scraps. The one in the photo is about 7.75 x 8 inches. You can download, print and trace this bib template, or just freehand one.

2. Pin the two pieces together, pretty sides out.

3. Starting from the top corner, sandwich the raw edges of the fabric between a first piece of bias-tape, from one side to the other, pinning as you go. Keep in mind that the longer side of the bias-tape goes on the back so that it will “catch” when you sew it down (see this great bias-tape tutorial and video). We’re using pre-made bias tape that is 1/2″ wide folded, but you can learn to make your own from this video .

4. Cut the bias tape on both ends so that it is flush with the fabric, or just slightly longer. Sew this piece of tape down with a straight stitch, close to the edge of where the tape meets the fabric, but being careful not to fall off the edge of the tape. If it is important to you, match the top thread to the top fabric and the bottom thread to the terrycloth.

4. Next, sandwich and pin a second piece of bias-tape around the remaining outside perimeter, being sure to leave enough tape on both ends (about 11-12″) to form the strings for tying. Fold under the raw edge tips of the tape ties and tuck inside itself for a neat appearance.

5. Starting on one end of the tape, sew the tape together, all the way around until you get to the other side. Now just snip the threads and your done!


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Appliqued Handtowels in 5 easy steps

While we were in Colorado earlier this month, I had an opportunity to watch my mother-in-law make this fun set of appliqued handtowels as a gift. She made it look so easy! Here are the materials and steps she used:

Materials
Dishtowel
Double sided fusible interface
Fabric scrap for the design
Thread for both the top side and bottom side

1. Find an image that you like and cut the shape out of both the interface and fabric. Sandy chose to use this cat image.

2. Sandwich the fusible interface between the dishtowel and the fabric, and iron them together until they are properly adhered.

3. Using a satin stitch (also called applique stitch, or tight zig-zag stitch), sew around the border of your shape. This will cover the raw edges of the fabric. I was surprised to note that Sandy kept the feed dog up, yet was able to move the fabric around with her fingers pretty easily.

4. After the border of the shape is done, use a pencil to draw the inner details to be “traced” by stitching. Sandy wanted to use a thinner satin stitch, so she adjusted the settings on her sewing machine and did a few tests before continuing.

5. Stitch over the pencil marks to add detail. Sandy noted that it is very helpful to always snip the loose threads as you go.

The finished designs!


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Sewing Calendar 2010

Look what arrived in the mail today! My very own copy of the 2010 Sewing Calendar! It features over 100 cute and inspiring sewing projects, including my Felt Photo Album tutorial! It is so cool to see one of my projects in print. No, I don’t get any perks from being included or from the sale of the calendar, but it just feels good, you know? Which reminds me, I haven’t done anything crafty for the longest time. Perhaps it is time to start something. 🙂

P.S. The photo above is from Amazon, but Made by Petchy has some nice detail photos here.


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Fast food cupcakes by Bakerella

….

Aren’t these hamburger shaped cupcakes fantastic? And check out those sugar cookie french fries! Bakerella has an awesome tutorial complete with download and print packaging templates. If I thought they’d get eaten around here I would definitely give it a try for Father’s Day. Which makes me wonder… does anyone know of a tutorial for fly fishing themed cupcakes?
Via Twig & Thistle


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Decorative Paperclips Using Brads

Here’s a set of spiffy paperclips I made as part of a Christmas gift this past December. To make them, the only supplies needed are:

  • Paperclips
  • Brads
  • Needle-Nosed Pliers
  • Wire cutters
  • Glue Gun (optional)

First, bend the fasteners on the back of the brad around the top two sides of the paperclip, cutting off the ends that extend beyond the brad’s face. Tighten the fasteners down using the pliers. If the brad is attached loosely, you can always add a little hot glue to keep it from shifting. Let dry and you have a little bling to dress up your paper files.



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Baby Craft Tutorial Roundup

A while back I started a page devoted completely to cool baby craft tutorials. There is a tab below the blog header that links to it. It contains a mix of my own tutorials and other people’s projects. So far there are tutorials for baby hair clips, appliqued onesies, felt baby shoes, burp cloths, kimono wrap, diaper and wipes pouch (poopy clutch), knit hat with earflaps, LED baby booties, diaper cake and embellishing baby tees. I hope to add more as I come across them on the net, so check back if you’re interested, or let me know what some of your favorite ones are and I’ll add them to the list.


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Resin Jewelry Video Tutorial


Resin and Silver-Plated Rings and Pewter Pendants by John W. Golden

I have always wanted to try making resin jewelry. It seems like it could be such a unique and versatile medium, but every time I try and search for the supplies, like the pendant casings, I never seem to have much luck. I’ve also searched many times for a resin jewelry class here in Portland, but either it my usually superb google skills let me down, or classes like this just aren’t offered in my area. Has anyone else had any luck? Anyway, my interest has once again been renewed by this 3-part Resin Jewelry Making Video Tutorial. It is a little drawn out, but the artist does a great job explaining his processs. Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 found on craftstylish.com.

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